The Map of Marvels by David Calcutt

The Map of Marvels

Written by David Calcutt

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The Lovereading4Kids comment

A powerful work of imagination, The Map of Marvels explores the terror of what happens when the imaginary world begins to become real and when fiction invades life. Connor is inspired to create a map of an imaginary place when he comes across a dusty old map which falls from a book. But then things he didn’t draw begin to appear on the map. How do they appear? Soon Connor becomes confused about what is real and what is a story. Full of menace and wonder, this is an intriguing story full of surprise.


The Map of Marvels by David Calcutt

When Connor starts creating a map of an imaginary world for his school project he has no idea where it will lead. As he draws the outlines of the islands and the mountains, the map begins to take shape. And then there's the tower-ominous and threatening - but so necessary that without it the map would not be complete. Perhaps without the tower, the map might not even exist. But the map does exist, and so does the tower. As Connor enters the world he's created he meets others there who all have their own tale to tell. Together they travel between many worlds, on many adventures and through many stories. On their journey they encounter places and creatures beyond Connor's imagination. But he has imagined them, hasn't he? Surely this world can't be real, because if it is, his life at home must just be another story ...


[Praise for David Calcutt's Shadow Bringer]: A haunting and powerful psychological thriller ... With beautifully drawn characters and a real sense of brooding menace, the author has succeeded in blending reality with magic It's beautifully written and will appeal particularly to fans of David Almond. Jill Murphy, The Bookbag [Praise for David Calcutt's Crowboy]: incredibly powerful and moving Birmingham Post This is a stunning book, daring, brilliantly written and 'staged' ... If it doesn't win prizes, there's something badly wrong with the literary world. Yahya Arrassi,

About the Author

David Calcutt

David Calcutt was born in Wednesbury, West Midlands, in 1950, and now lives in Walsall. He taught in schools for ten years, then was a Community Arts Director for three years. He is now a freelance playwright and storyteller. The main influences on his work are myth and folk-tale. "Those ancient myths have provided us with some of our greatest works of literature, art, music and theatre...."

Q & A on Shadow Bringer with David Calcutt

1. What inspired you to write Shadow Bringer?

2. Describe it in two lines?

3. How long did it take you to write?

4. What do you think people will say about this book?

5. Are you working on something else at the moment?

6. What is your favourite food?

7. What makes you laugh out loud?

8. What is your one luxury item you would take with you on to a Desert Island?

9. What is your most treasured memory?

10. What is your weakness?

11. What is the worst/most unusual job you have ever done?

12. What is your most embarrassing moment?

13. What is the best piece of advice you have ever received?

14. What is the best piece of advice you could give to someone?

15. Last album brought? First album ever brought?

The first that I bought myself was, I think, “The Times They Are A-Changin’” by Bob Dylan. The most recent is “Elegy of the Uprooting” by the Greek composer Eleni Karaindrou. The Greeks call her the tenth muse. She is.

“Njal’s Saga” by an anonymous and brilliant Icelandic writer, and “Light in August” by William Faulkner. Also Ted Hughes’ poetry - but then I’m always reading this.

The music from “The Third Man”. Orson Welles. In fact I’d rather be in that film.

The Greek island of Lesvos

Shakespeare, Ted Hughes, Dylan Thomas, William Golding, Nikos Kazantzakis, George Seferis, Herman Melville, William Faulkner, Flannery O’ Connor, Jorge Luis Borges, John Steinbeck, James Joyce.

“Treasure Island” by Robert Louis Stevenson

My bike, and whatever notebook I happen to be writing in.

I’m pretty happy in most places.

Chocolate digestives.

Too many to list. Stupidity’s probably at the top.

I’d be less quick to judge, and work harder

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Book Info


256 pages


David Calcutt
More books by David Calcutt

Author's Website



Oxford University Press

Publication date

5th August 2010




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