The Ghost of Grotteskew by Guy Bass

The Ghost of Grotteskew

Written by Guy Bass
Illustrated by Pete Williamson
Part of the Stitch Head Series

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Fans of Marcus Sedgwick's Raven Mysteries and Lemony Snicket will love the Stitch Head titles. Join Stitch Head, a mad professor’s forgotten creation, on another freakishly funny adventure! Having already escaped the clutches of a creepy circus master and a legendary pirate, Stitch Head – the almost-human result of the frightfully insane Professor Erasmus’ experiments – has his third outing in The Ghost of Grotteskew. A villainous spirit is haunting the corridors of Castle Grotteskew, and he’s after two things: Stitch Head’s heart… and soul.


The Ghost of Grotteskew by Guy Bass

Join Stitch Head as he steps out of the shadows into the adventure of an almost-lifetime...The ghost of a villainous ne'er-do-well is haunting the corridors of Castle Grotteskew, gunning for Stitch Head's heart ...and soul. Certain that his heart once belonged to the vicious rogue, Stitch Head's world is torn apart. Will he surrender to the evil ghost and agree to do his bidding...?

About the Author

Guy Bass

Guy Bass grew up dreaming of being a superhero – he even had a Spider-Man costume. The costume doesn't fit anymore, so Guy now contents himself with writing and drawing the occasional picture. He writes the Gormy Ruckles series for Scholastic UK, as well as the popular Dinkin Dings series for Stripes. In 2010, Dinkin Dings and the Frightening Things won a CBBC Blue Peter Book Award in the "Most Fun Story with Pictures" category. Guy lives in London with his wife.

A Q&A with the Author

Where did the idea for the Stitch Head series come from? I wanted to write a gothic monster / mad professor story. The initial idea was about two leftover body parts from the professor’s experiments - an arm and leg - which were alive, and understandably resented their lot! As it turns out, living limbs are considered a bit much for children’s fiction, and I was rightly asked to think again. Then I started to wonder how this mad professor got started. Maybe his first creation wasn’t all that monstrous or scary or impressive; maybe it had been forgotten, like an old toy, and longed to be remembered. I did a sketch of a little creature with stitches all over his face and things started to fall into place.

Apart from Stitch Head, who have been your favourite characters in the series? Arabella is fun to write. She became a major character almost by accident. She’s everything Stitch Head isn’t – rash, brash, and recklessly bold – and she approaches every problem by kicking it in the nose. The Creature is great when I want to give Stitch Head something to worry about. It always turns up at the right moment and does the wrong thing – the perfect storm of good intentions and terrible execution.

When you started the series did you know how many you would be writing? It was initially a one-book contract so I did sort of think that was that. I crammed so much into that first story, but ended up having to trim a lot. What I took out became the basis of the second book, and by the time I’d written that I had book three plotted, and so on.

Stitch Head has recently been voted by kids as one of the best Children’s books, how did this make you feel? Gobsmacked, incredulous and humbled, in that order. Everybody involved in Stitch Head put in heaps of work into it, so I’m so chuffed people like it. That vote meant a lot, especially as there was no shortlist. Bonkers. Plus, it was good to know all those bribes paid off.

Sadly this is the last book in the Stitch Head series, but do you have any other books coming? I don’t know how to spell a drum-roll, but I’m making the sound... my new series is called SPYnosaur. I’m really excited about it. It’s your classic secret-agent-gets-his-brainwaves-put-into-the-body-of-a-dinosaur-and-teams-up-with-his-daughter-to-battle-international-criminal-masterminds. With added monkeys.

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Book Info


208 pages
Interest Age: From 8


Guy Bass
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Stripes Publishing, an imprint of Magi Publications an imprint of Magi Publications

Publication date

1st September 2012




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