The Yellowcake Conspiracy by Stephen Davies


The Yellowcake Conspiracy by Stephen Davies

Fourteen-year-old Haroun divides his time between herding cows and working in a uranium mine. When the director of the mine is murdered, an agent of the French government appears and recruits Haroun as a spy. Haroun soon finds himself torn by divided cultural loyalties; but when he unearths a shocking nuclear conspiracy, he plunges into a deadly race against time. Perfect for teaching: * multiple text forms * how to build supsense * different cultures.

About the Author

Stephen Davies

Stephen Davies is a missionary who lives amongst Fulani herders in West Africa, one of the poorest regions of the world. He speaks Fulfulde, eats millet, accompanies cattle-drives and preaches the gospel in culturally relevant ways and lives a life just like those others who live there. He writes for the Guardian Weekly (letters from Burkina Faso) and occasionally for the Sunday Times.

VOICE IN THE DESERT - A Day in the Life of Stephen Davies:

I live in Djibo, a small town on the edge of the Sahara desert. Most of the year it is simply too hot to sleep inside the house, so my wife Charlie hangs a mosquito net from a tree in our back yard. We wake up to the usual early-morning soundtrack of donkeys, cockerels and cows. Lie-ins are rare because we have animals of our own to feed: three French hens, two black and white kittens and a hungry stallion called Silalé. Greeting is important in African societies, so I first go round saying hello to our neighbours: Jam waali (Did you pass the night in peace?), Noy koreeji maa (How is your family?), we sing the long greeting sequence back and forth. The answer to these questions is invariably Jam tan (Peace only). When they answer ‘Jam tan’, my neighbours are putting a brave face on things: in reality this region is one of the poorest in the world.
My work here as a missionary includes humanitarian relief: grain handouts, yes, but also working with individuals to find creative ways out of poverty. A donkey and cart for Bukari, a sheep for Mariama, school fees for Adama – the slow, intangible work of development.

A missionary is also a storyteller, and I love sharing stories with people – ancient stories which still have incredible power to inspire and transform the human heart.
In the afternoon, I write. I bash away on my laptop with sweat dripping off my elbows. I’m so grateful to my friends and neighbours here for sharing their lives with me – it’s their truth which inspires my fiction.

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Book Info


208 pages


Stephen Davies
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Author's Website


Publication date

27th January 2009



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