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Audiobooks by Alexander Hamilton

Browse audiobooks by Alexander Hamilton, listen to samples and when you're ready head over to Audiobooks.com where you can get 3 FREE audiobooks on us

LoveReading4Kids Top 10

  1. The Burpee Bears The Burpee Bears
    1
  2. How Winston Delivered Christmas: A Christmas Story in Twenty-Four-and-a-Half Chapters How Winston Delivered Christmas: A Christmas Story in Twenty-Four-and-a-Half Chapters
    2
  3. The Christmas Carrolls The Christmas Carrolls
    3
  4. The Snowman: Inspired by the original story by Raymond Briggs The Snowman: Inspired by the original story by Raymond Briggs
    4
  5. The Miracle on Ebenezer Street The Miracle on Ebenezer Street
    5
  6. Father Christmas's Fake Beard Father Christmas's Fake Beard
    6
  7. The Midnight Guardians The Midnight Guardians
    7
  8. The Boy Who Made the World Disappear The Boy Who Made the World Disappear
    8
  9. The Fowl Twins The Fowl Twins
    9
  10. When The World Was Ours When The World Was Ours
    10
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Federalist No. 74. The Command of the Military and Naval Forces, and the Pardoning Power of the Exec

Federalist No. 74. The Command of the Military and Naval Forces, and the Pardoning Power of the Exec

Author: Alexander Hamilton Narrator: D. S. Harvey Release Date: 01/12/2020

The Federalist Papers is a series of 85 articles arguing in favor of ratification of the United States Constitution by the thirteen original colonies. Federalist No. 74 discusses the powers of the president as commander-in-chief and to grant pardons and reprieves. Hamilton asserts that the role of commander-in-chief is inherent in the office itself and requires the speed and resolve of a single decision-maker. He argues that vesting such powers among multiple executives could prove disastrous in the real world of military conflict. A similar argument is made regarding the power to pardon and issue reprieves, sensing correctly that group psychology might suppress the compassion to grant mercy or the courage to uphold justice when the case seems to demand it. Interestingly, he cites the need to act swiftly to grant pardons in certain situations in order to capitalize on a fleeting possibility to resolve a difficult situation, particularly in the event of rebellion. The power to grant pardons has been controversial at times, with concerns that pardons are granted for political purposes rather than to serve justice or mercy.

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The Federalist Papers (Unabridged)

The Federalist Papers (Unabridged)

Author: Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay Narrator: Brian Morris Release Date: 01/06/2020

Thomas Jefferson hailed The Federalist Papers as the best commentary ever written about the principles of government. Milestones in political science and enduring classics of political philosophy, these articles are essential reading for students, lawyers, politicians, and those with an interest in the foundation of U.S. government and law.

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FEDERALIST No. 65. The Powers of the Senate Continued

FEDERALIST No. 65. The Powers of the Senate Continued

Author: Alexander Hamilton Narrator: D. S. Harvey Release Date: 01/01/2020

The Federalist Papers is a series of 85 articles arguing in favor of ratification of the United States Constitution by the thirteen original colonies. The Federalist papers were written in response to criticism of the Constitution. The articles were first published between October 1787 and August 1788 in newspapers and then published in book form in 1788. Federalist No. 65 discusses the reasoning behind the choice of the Senate to conduct Impeachment trials. He is sanguine about the danger of political factions polarizing the proceedings. He rejects the Supreme Court as too small a body to represent the general public and posits that assigning the House, the representative elected by the body politic, the responsibility of bringing charges and prosecuting an impeachment, and assigning the Senate, a body of wise elders elected by state legislatures, the task trying the matter, is the best that can be done to bring about a necessary separation of powers to achieve a fair and just outcome.

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FEDERALIST No. 66. Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further

FEDERALIST No. 66. Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further

Author: Alexander Hamilton Narrator: D. S. Harvey Release Date: 01/01/2020

The Federalist Papers is a series of 85 articles arguing in favor of ratification of the United States Constitution by the thirteen original colonies. When the Constitutional Convention met in 1787 to revise the Articles of Confederation, James Madison and Alexander Hamilton advocated instead for the creation of a new government. The delegates used the principles contained in Madison's Virginia Plan to create the Constitution, which was submitted to the states in September 1787. The Federalist papers were written in response to criticism of the Constitution. Federalist No. 66 is a continuation of the argument in Federalist No. 65 for the Senate as the trial venue for impeachments. In No. 66 he addresses specific anti-Federalist objections in a series of four rebuttals. The issues addressed are: first, the concern that the Senate is encroaching on the powers of the courts; second, that the Senate itself may become too aristocratic; third, that impartiality may suffer when trying appointed officials previously approved by the same body; and, fourth, that the Senators may be unable to judge their own actions impartially in ratifying treaties.

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Speech on the Compromises of the Constitution

Speech on the Compromises of the Constitution

Author: Alexander Hamilton Narrator: Bradley Parsons Release Date: 01/08/2018

Alexander Hamilton is considered one of the most important contributors to our constitution, and for good reason. In this speech, he addresses the handling of the constitution, and more importantly those compromises. While he acknowledges that compromises might need to be made for long-term stability's sake, he also underlies that America had been compliant up to that point. The end called to action the need for the government subsiding over the constitution to be fair and just.

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The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers are a collection of eighty-five articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay in favor of ratifying the United States Constitution. First appearing in 1787 as a series of letters to New York newspapers, this collective body of work is widely considered to be among the most important historical collections of all time. Although the authors of The Federalist Papers foremost intended to influence the vote in favor of ratifying the Constitution, in Federalist No. 1 Hamilton explicitly set their debate in broader political terms. “It has been frequently remarked,” he wrote, “that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force." Among the many highlights of these acclaimed essays is Federalist No. 10, in which Madison discusses the means of preventing rule by majority faction and advocates for a large, commercial republic. This is generally regarded as the most important of the eighty-five essays from a philosophical perspective, and it is complemented by Federalist No. 14, in which Madison takes the measure of the United States, declares it appropriate for an extended republic, and concludes with a memorable defense of the Constitution. In Federalist No. 70, Hamilton advocates for a one-man chief executive, and in Federalist No. 78 he persuasively lays the groundwork for the doctrine of judicial review by federal courts.

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The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers

Author: Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay Narrator: Group Release Date: 01/03/2017

Written by Alexander Hamilton, John Madison and John Jay - three of the Founding Fathers of the United States of America - The Federalist Papers combined to form one of the most important document in American history. Containing a collection of 85 detailed papers about the US Constitution and the explanation of the various laws that the Government itself has to abide by, along with every single one of its branches, this writing presented more or less in laymen terms the exact reasons why ratifying the Constitution was a good idea. The Papers offer a detailed outline on the separation of powers and on how political power has to be used within severe limitation in order to prevent the people from having to give up their freedom and rights as citizens. Written in a time when the ratification of the Constitution still hung in the balance, they acted as a valuable incentive to help inform and convince both state legislators and the general population of its crucial importance. To exemplify the value of The Federalist Papers, it is worth mentioning the suggestion that the late historian Clinton Rossiter made regarding anyone who didn't wish to be burdened with reading all 85 of the papers included in this work. He recommended a number of papers as the ones he considered to be the "most important," while later admitting that whoever read that selection would want to continue with the rest as well. The Federalist Papers played a major role in the acceptance and ratification of the US Constitution, and are considered to be a writing of significant cultural, historical and political value today. If you want to learn more about your rights as an American citizen and the limitations of the US Central and Federal Government, as they were defined by the Founding Fathers themselves, reading this remarkable piece of political literature is an absolute must.

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The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers

Author: Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay Narrator: Michael Edwards Release Date: 01/01/2011

The U.S. Constitution was approved by the Constitutional Convention on September 17, 1787. It was to become law only if it was ratified by nine of the thirteen states. New York was a key state, but it contained strong forces opposing the Constitution. A series of eighty-five letters appeared in New York City newspapers between October 1787 and August 1788 urging support for the Constitution. These letters remain the first and most authoritative commentary on the American concept of federal government. Later known as The Federalist Papers, they were published under the pseudonym 'Publius,' although written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay. 'The Federalist Papers stand as key documents in the founding of the United States.''Amazon.com, Editorial Review

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The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers

Author: Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay Narrator: Arthur Morey Release Date: 01/12/2010

The Federalist Papers---a collection of eighty-five essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay in support of the adoption of the U.S. Constitution---serves as the primary source for interpreting the Constitution and outlines the philosophy and motivation behind this newly proposed government system.

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