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Audiobooks Narrated by Mike Shah

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LoveReading4Kids Top 10

  1. Aldrin Adams and the Cheese Nightmares Aldrin Adams and the Cheese Nightmares
    1
  2. Big Sky Mountain Big Sky Mountain
    2
  3. The Danger Gang The Danger Gang
    3
  4. How to Be Brave How to Be Brave
    4
  5. Anne of Green Gables Anne of Green Gables
    5
  6. Star Wars The High Republic: A Test of Courage Star Wars The High Republic: A Test of Courage
    6
  7. How I Saved the World in a Week How I Saved the World in a Week
    7
  8. Hide and Secrets: The blockbuster thriller from million-copy bestselling Sophie McKenzie Hide and Secrets: The blockbuster thriller from million-copy bestselling Sophie McKenzie
    8
  9. The Boy in the Black Suit The Boy in the Black Suit
    9
  10. You Are a Champion: How to Be the Best You Can Be You Are a Champion: How to Be the Best You Can Be
    10
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The Final Count

The Final Count

Author: Sapper Narrator: Mike Shah, Roy McMillan Release Date: 01/12/2012

There seems to be an inexhaustible demand for action heroes. From the earliest fictions to the current films, television series, novels and graphic novels, our appetite for the hero (and it does tend to be hero rather than heroine, Lara Croft notwithstanding) has maintained an astonishing vigour. After the previously unimaginable destruction of the First World War, it would have been understandable if the public had turned away from violence and decided to allow their imaginations to exercise in calmer fields of interest, or at least with heroes who would be less physical in their determination to uphold what is right. This was not the case. In both the United States and Britain, the glut of hard-talking, fast-shooting, morally certain sluggers poured out into the eager hands of a public who - if nothing else - clearly liked to know which side was the good one, and to see it win comprehensively. In inter-War Britain the man who found the perfect action hero for his time was Herman Cyril McNeile, who wrote under the pseudonym 'Sapper' and created one of the genre's most iconic characters: Bulldog Drummond. McNeile was born in Cornwall to a Naval man (at the time the governor of a Naval prison), and went from school to the military academy in Woolwich, London. From there he joined the Royal Engineers, whose underground tunnellers were known as 'sappers' (hence his later nickname). He was with them throughout the War and was awarded the Military Cross in the process; but he seems to have been writing before the outbreak of the War. It is not easy to be certain, since serving officers could not use their real names in articles or stories, which was why he needed a pseudonym in the first place. By the end of the War he was already a successful and popular author and he resigned from the Army to write full-time, publishing the first of the Bulldog Drummond books in 1920. They continued to appear until his death, upon which Gerard Fairlie (McNeile's friend and one of the inspirations for Bulldog Drummond himself) continued the series into the '50s. Although many of McNeile's works were popular, it was his Bulldog Drummond stories that seemed to capture the public imagination most forcibly (and most often - there were scores of radio and film adaptations as well as books). Drummond served as a perfect bridge between several worlds. McNeile recognised that the character was a new version of older sleuthing types such as Sherlock Holmes and Raffles, and thus linked pre-War Britain (or more particularly England) with the contemporary realities of the 1920s. What he could not have known was that his character would himself prove a model on which future writers would base their heroes. The creators of The Saint and James Bond readily acknowledged their debt to Sapper, making him a development in the story of detective and adventure stories from the late 19th through to the 21st centuries. The obverse of this popularity was that some writers became so infuriated with the all-pervasive influence of Drummond-like characters that they either spoofed them or went out of their way to ensure that none of their protagonists' qualities were in any way like them. This is understandable. The idea of Bulldog Drummond has become so familiar, entrenched almost, that it is difficult sometimes to discern the strength and originality of the character; and the less appealing elements can be magnified beyond their true stature precisely because the caricature is so much more immediate. What was really there was a figure who embodied a particular kind of Englishness. Bulldog Drummond was independently wealthy and thus free of the day-to-day concerns of earning a living. He had 'done his bit' in the War - no shirking of national or personal responsibility - and done it with skill and daring. He had no doubt about what was right and should therefore be protected, and he had no qualms about doing so with his fists or a gun. But what he also possessed was a particular kind of ironic solidity: a strength without vanity, realistic yet self-mocking, and allied to a sense of delight and absurdity. Life's a game, and it had better be a good one; let's have a martini at the club, old fruit, before we tackle the international master-criminal. McNeile called those who possessed these qualities 'The Breed'. All this is admirable, feeds the Englishman's sense of himself, and adds to the gaiety of nations (as well as making many readers wish they were possessed of similar sang froid). But lurking within this was another set of values which were largely universal in the readership of the time but which frankly rankle now. Drummond is privileged, monied and seemingly unaware of the inequity of this. He has no doubts, and is never presented with anything where the right course to adopt is questionable. He assumes that the values of the Empire are all good, and that pretty much all foreigners are not to be trusted, and can be dismissed with derogatory adjectival promptness. Concerns about these shortcomings are valid, but they are not the core reason for the continuing appeal of the books and should not obscure what that appeal is. They are failings but they also reflect the attitudes of the time; and, most significantly of all, they are no more than minor interjections in the text rather than its essence. Its essence is a pounding good adventure story; a thriller where the plot races with gusto, where the villain is able to adopt disguises that can fool the closest inspection, where bizarre and terrible characters can plot outlandish heists, where we can trust the hero and wonder how he will escape, enjoying his unruffled wit as he faces what must surely be a gruesome death. There is a rich canon of these adventure stories, one that continues to grow. Bulldog Drummond sits proudly at the head of it, charming, brave and undaunted.

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A Sentimental Journey

A Sentimental Journey

Author: Laurence Sterne Narrator: Anton Lesser, Duncan Williams, Mike Shah Release Date: 01/11/2011

Published just months before his death in 1768, A Sentimental Journey is Sterne's lightly fictionalised account of his own European travels; and being Sterne, it is more about digressions, misunderstandings and risqué jokes than the places he visits. Narrated by the (apparently) innocent Parson Yorick, who appeared in Sterne's other masterpiece, Tristram Shandy, it is full of anecdote and incident, and is far more about the people than the landscapes on the road from Calais. Despite the title, any sentimentality is offset by the elegance of the writing, the engaging companionship of Yorick himself and the constant, playful surprises.

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Venetia

Venetia

Author: Georgette Heyer Narrator: Mike Shah, Richard Armitage Release Date: 01/04/2011

Venetia Lanyon, beautiful, intelligent and independent, lives in comfortable seclusion in rural Yorkshire with her precocious brother Aubrey. Her future seems safe and predictable: either marriage to the respectable but dull Edward Yardley, or a life of peaceful spinsterhood. But when she meets the dashing, dangerous rake Lord Damerel, her well-ordered life is turned upside down, and she embarks upon a relationship with him that scandalises and horrifies the whole community. Has she found her soul-mate, or is she playing with fire?

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Flanagan's Run

Flanagan's Run

Author: Tom McNab Narrator: Josh Brooks, Mike Shah, Rupert Degas Release Date: 01/02/2011

During the Depression the ebullient American entrepreneur Charles Flanagan assembles 2,000 runners from all corners of the earth, to run from Los Angeles to New York for prize-money of $150,000. Flanagan's Trans-America runners face 3,000 miles, across the Mojave desert and the frozen Rockies, running a daily average of 50 miles for three months. The American sports establishment, however, is desperate to crush what it sees as a professional challenge to the 1932 Los Angeles Olympics. Every day is therefore a struggle for survival, for Flanagan himself as well as the runners. Flanagan's Run is an epic tale, and a testimony to the strength of the human spirit.

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The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald Narrator: Mike Shah, William Hope Release Date: 01/08/2010

Elegant, enigmatic Jay Gatsby yearns for his old love, the beautiful Daisy. But she is married to the insensitive if hugely successful Tom Buchanan, who won't let her go despite having a mistress himself. In their wealthy haven, these beguiling lives are brought together by the innocent and entranced narrator, Nick - until their decadent deceits spill into violence and tragedy. Part morality tale, part fairy tale, The Great Gatsby is the consummate novel of the Jazz Age. Its tenderness and poetry make it one of the great works of the 20th century.

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The Great Poets

The Great Poets

Author: Petrarch Francesco Narrator: Anton Lesser, Mike Shah Release Date: 01/06/2010

This 14th-century Italian poet was a model for many who followed him. His passionate sonnets to Laura became the epitome for love poetry. Over some 40 years he wrote 366 sonnets to Laura, whom he probably never even spoke to, and they remain immediate and affecting even now. Called Rime Sparse (Scattered Rhymes), they influenced Chaucer and many others. This is an unusual addition to 'The Great Poets', but part of the intention of the series is to cover the major stepping stones of world poetry. Translated by Joseph Auslander.

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The Great Poets

The Great Poets

Author: John Donne Narrator: Geoffrey Whitehead, Mike Shah, Will Keen Release Date: 01/06/2010

Sophisticated wit and intense emotion, religious fervour and erotic sensuality, delight in life's pleasures and fascination with death, are all to be found in the paradoxical poetry of John Donne. One of the foremost metaphysical poets, Donne's ingenious metaphors and inspired use of language has earned him affection and reverence in near equal measure to Shakespeare. This collection of his finest poetry showcases the diverse range of his work, and includes Death Be Not Proud, A Hymn to God the Father, For Whom the Bell Tolls, Go Catch a Falling Star, The Flea and To His Mistress Going to Bed.

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Cousin Phillis

Cousin Phillis

Author: Elizabeth Gaskell Narrator: Joe Marsh, Mike Shah Release Date: 01/05/2010

Cousin Phillis - a miniature masterpiece - is set in the 1840s, when the coming of the railway was changing the face of England, and quiet rural communities, coming into contact with the outside world, were changed for ever. The story focuses on the effect these changes have on a naïve country girl, Phillis, as she encounters love, with all its pains and pleasures, for the first time.

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Martin Chuzzlewit

Martin Chuzzlewit

Author: Charles Dickens Narrator: Mike Shah, Ross Burman, Sean Barrett Release Date: 01/04/2010

The Chuzzlewits are a family divided by money and selfishness; even young Martin, the eponymous hero, is arrogant and self-centred. He offends his grandfather by falling in love with the latter's ward, Mary, and sets out to make his own fortune in life, travelling as far as America - which produces from Dickens a savage satire on a new world tainted with the vices of the old. Martin's nature slowly changes through his bitter experience of life and his enduring love for Mary. Martin Chuzzlewit is one of Dickens's most humorous and satirical novels, and it contains two great comic creations: the hypocrite Pecksniff and the drunken nurse Sarah Gamp.

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