Riding Icarus by Lily Hyde
  

Riding Icarus

Written by Lily Hyde

9+ readers   Debuts of the Month   11+ readers   eBooks   
Download an extract Add to wishlist Share this book

The Lovereading4Kids comment

A thrilling mix of modern fairytale and adventure with elements of magical realism set in Kiev and featuring a girl who lives in a flying trolleybus. Inspired by the author’s love of Russian fairytales and her travels in Kiev.

Synopsis

Riding Icarus by Lily Hyde

When rich Uncle Igor sends her mother abroad to work, Masha stays in Kiev and moves into an old, disused trolleybus called Icarus. But one night there is a terrible storm and Icarus takes off! Masha is transported to an enchanted place where she discovers that, on midsummer eve, she will be able to wish for whatever her heart desires. But will Masha be able to find the enchanted place again and work out her hearts desire in time? And will she make the right wish to bring her mother back home so they can escape Igor’s clutches forever?

For more information, visit www.walkerbooks.co.uk

Reviews

'A heartwarming magical realist tale with a tough urban edge set in contemporary Ukraine' - Observer

About the Author

Lily Hyde

Lily Hyde is a British freelance writer and journalist based in Kiev, and has been covering cultural and social issues in the former Soviet Union for several years. Her journalism and travel writing have been widely published in the international press, including Newsweek, Marie Claire and New Internationalist. She also works as a consultant on HIV/AIDS and public health information. She has had short stories published but Riding Icarus is her first novel.

Q&A with Lily Hyde

1. From where did you get your inspiration in writing Riding Icarus?

There were two main inspirations. One is the area of Kiev I was living in which is precisely the landscape of the book – sunny meadows and half-abandoned allotments, stray dogs, Mercedes cars and battered trolleybuses, overflowing markets and all. Many things have altered almost unrecognisably in Kiev since I started writing Riding Icarus (for instance, top-of-the-range Mercedes are now two-a-penny) but this area is still almost unchanged. The other is a collection of tales by Nikolai Gogol called Village Evenings Near Dikanka. They are funny, frightening, magical and humdrum all at once, describing Ukrainian village life nearly two centuries ago as well as many traditional Ukrainian myths and legends.

2. Did you write it for yourself or for an imaginary reader?

Neither – it was written for my sister, who was ten when I started (she’s now nearly 20!). Because I was living in Kiev I didn’t see her very often, and it was a way of keeping in touch and telling her something about life in Ukraine. I sent her each chapter as I finished it but sometimes she had to wait an awfully long time for the next instalment.

I think there’s magic to be found in most things so I didn’t find it hard at all – I just hope it works as one narrative. Ukraine especially for me has always been a place that mixes real, wonderful enchantment with a lot of genuine hardship and horror. The latter might not seem a suitable subject for a children’s book, but I didn’t want to write only about the funny and enchanting side because although Riding Icarus is in many ways a fairytale I think all true fairytales are grounded in reality. Many children everywhere suffer hardship but sometimes hope and belief in magic really can offer a way out of trouble (I just wish they did as often as happens in books).

4. Did you come up with the plot first or did the characters appear to you first?

The characters – in this case, Icarus the trolleybus was the first character! Then obviously someone had to live inside Icarus, and along came Masha and her grandmother.

5. Did you know the ending of the story before you started writing the book?

I started writing it such a long time ago that I really can’t remember! I hope I at least roughly knew the end by chapter three or so, because otherwise I don’t know what I thought I was doing sending it to my sister chapter by chapter.

6. Do you plan out the skeleton of a story first before writing the first page of a novel or do you start with a blank page in front of you?

I don’t write a plan – it’s much more exciting starting with a blank page (or computer screen in my case). Then it’s really a bit like magic when the words come along… And those words might take me somewhere quite different from where I was expecting – like a ride in Icarus the trolleybus really. But I do mull ideas over in my head for a long time first, so I have a mental framework.

Anon. – author of all the best folk and fairytales! I’d like to recommend the Gogol stories I mentioned above but I’m not sure how many of them are available in English. Some of his later stories are more famous; for instance The Nose, which is about a man who wakes up one morning to find out his nose has gone off and started living an independent life without him!
Some children’s authors I love and which I’m sure influenced Riding Icarus are Joan Aiken, Elizabeth Goudge and Pat O’Shea (The Hounds of the Morrigan). Then, when I reached about seventeen and onwards, Angela Carter, Russell Hoban, Mikhail Bulgakov…

More books by this author

Loading similar books...

Other Formats

Book Info

Format

Paperback
208 pages
Interest Age: 9+

Author

Lily Hyde
More books by Lily Hyde

Publisher

Walker Books Ltd

Publication date

7th July 2008

ISBN

9781406307665

Categories


It gives me a chance to read types of books that I would not normally try, and it motivates me to read every night to finish it!

Alice Horncastle, age 14

Lovereading4kids is great, we get books really early never late. We love to read and review, and think you would like it too. The excitement

Jasmine Harris-Hart, age 12

I love all the books they recommend & put up for me to review. I also love the fact that they give new authors the chance to share their boo

Daisy Pennock – age 15

You give me age appropriate ideas of books I can read and buy for the children and find out what other children their age think of them too.

Katie Lonsdale

Lovereading is just a convenient way to find new books and hear others opinions on them.

Sarah Murray – age 15

It’s really exciting to read and review new books, thrilling to see my reviews online and I love finding the final published copies on sale.

Sam Harper – age 10

I love ‘LoveReading 4 kids’ because they let you read and learn things you’d never dreamed of learning before.

Emily Horncastle – age 11

I think Lovereading4kids is an amazing company because of the friendly staff and the fabulous chance to read great books before publication.

Adam Graham
Lovereading

Lovereading 4 schools