Daisy Saves the Day by Shirley Hughes
  

Daisy Saves the Day

Written by Shirley Hughes
Illustrated by Shirley Hughes

5+ readers   7+ readers   
Download an extract Add to wishlist Share this book

The Lovereading4Kids comment

This charming picture book is an enchanting evocation of life in London at the time of the coronation of George V, by the much-loved and award-winning illustrators for children, Shirley Hughes. Perfect to share with younger children but also a great picture book for more confident readers to bridge the gap between picture books and chapter books.

Synopsis

Daisy Saves the Day by Shirley Hughes

When young Daisy Dobbs starts as a scullery maid in a grand house, she works as hard as she can to try and please her kindly employers. But her greatest day comes when disaster strikes, and only Daisy can save the day. This charming picture book, by the much-loved and award-winning Shirley Hughes contains evocative scenes of London during the coronation of George V.

Reviews

The indomitable Shirley Hughes knows how to tell a story and has never left it to her beguiling pictures to do all the work. Her new book, Daisy Saves the Day draws the reader in immediately to sympathise with little Daisy sent off to be a maid without any natural talent for housework. Daisy is employed by two elderly English ladies who are visited by their dashing American niece. (You can somehow guess that she is a Yank from her audacious purple suit.) Daisy's fortunes plummet then prosper, and by the end of the picture book you will feel as well-fed as if you had finished an entire and enjoyable novel. -- Kate Kellaway Observer Charming -- Fiona Noble Bookseller Children's Guide 'Daisy Saves the Day

- from the author of Dogger and the Alfie stories - is the ultimate comfort read ... a delightful introduction to the history of class and the importance of education. The Times A typically appealing story of goodwill and kindness and Hughes

, Daily Post (North Wales), Evening News (Teeside) and the South Wales Echo Loved, loved this book! babybuzz Magazine It's wonderful to see a new book from the brilliant Shirley Hughes and her nostalgic style is perfect for a book with a historical background... Yet again, Shirley Hughes has brought us a gem of a book. Parents in Touch Nostalgic in all the right ways. The Book Bag Charming baby & me Evocative storytelling at its best. Little London One of the country's best loved children's authors ... a poignant and charming story. Made for Mums Touching, colourful and a good story to read to the sixes-plus Newbury Weekly News A lovingly detailed evocation of Edwardian domestic life ... a vivid way to bring history alive for young readers The School Librarian The traditional storytelling of Shirley Hughes comes as a calming breathe of fresh air... the Upstairs Downstairs world of a scullery maid The Herald (Glasgow) A charming story of life below stairs with the delightful Daisy reminding me of the resourceful heroines of my Bunty-reading days! Hughes

's situation in seemingly effortless vignettes, alternating with wonderfully dramatic double spreads. Highly recommended. Children's Books Ireland Recommended Read An accurate evocation of the period Carousel A books to be read over and over Books for Keeps'

About the Author

Shirley Hughes

Winner of the Book Trust Lifetime Achievement Award 2015. Shirley Hughes was born and grew up in West Kirby, near Liverpool. She studied at Liverpool Art School and at the Ruskin School of Art in Oxford, before embarking on a career as a freelance illustrator. At first she worked as an interpretive illustrator, but she began to write and design her own picture books when her children were very young. Her first book, Lucy and Tom's Day, was published in 1960. Now living in London's Notting Hill, Shirley Hughes has illustrated over two hundred children's books and is renowned as a champion of children's literature.

She has been the recipient of the Other Award, the Kate Greenaway Medal and the prestigious Eleanor Farjeon Award. She was shortlisted for the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, which rewards the best in contemporary children's and young adult literature from all over the world, in 2010.

Shirley Hughes won the first ever Book Trust Lifetime Achievement Award for her outstanding contribution to children's literature.

Book Trust CEO, Diana Gerald, says: ‘Book Trust is thrilled that our first ever Lifetime Achievement Award goes to someone whose remarkable, multi-talented contribution to children's fiction spans several generations and continues to this day. Her characters are imprinted on the memories of two or three generations, a recognition of their enduring charm. This evergreen storytelling is something we particularly want to celebrate with this award. ‘Significantly, Shirley continues to innovate and create, providing young children with a love of reading that we know will give them a great start in life. We often hear about ‘national treasures’, but Shirley Hughes is up there with the best.’

Shirley Hughes, says: ’Being chosen for the Booktrust Lifetime Achievement Award is a tremendous honour which I appreciate more than I can say. I have derived so much fulfilment from my long career, first as an illustrator of other artists’ stories and then creating my own. Best of all has been perennially encountering very young children who are learning to look with such rapt pleasure and follow a story visually long before they are able to read.’

In her own words: As a child

I grew up in a quiet seaside town near Liverpool, in the days when there was no television, only radio, which we listened to a lot. My older sisters and I messed about in the back garden, pored over comics and surveyed the world from the flat garage roof. There were acres of time to be filled in then. We combatted boredom by dressing up and acting out plays to any audience we could press into service (including the cats), making up fantasy worlds and, of course, drawing pictures. There was a good supply of books. Most inspiring were wonderful illustrated classics, with colour plates by artists like Arthur Rackham and Will Heath Robinson. Later, the cinema was a terrific source of glamour and narrative, as were the Victorian paintings in the Walker Arts Gallery, Liverpool. I am pretty sure that having a lot of time to read, to dream or simply mooch about, played a major part in my becoming an author/illustrator.

As an adult

When our quiet, well-conducted suburban childhood was rudely interrupted by World War II, the grown-ups, as luck would have it, were far too absorbed in the war effort to bother much about our academic, social and cultural achievements. With me, drawing stuck. I just went on doing it. I wrote too, but kept that secret. I had a good high-school education, but I got out as soon as I could and went to Liverpool Art School to study costume design, and later, at the Ruskin School of Art, Oxford. This theatrical impulse turned into the desire to illustrate stories (another kind of theatre). I got the sketchbook habit, which has stayed with me always. You hang around, observing and drawing real people (especially, in my case, children), then you go back to the drawing board and make it all up. The characters in my stories are not my own children at that age, or anyone else's, but inspired by a combination of both.

As an artist

When I first started doing the rounds with a folio, way back in the1950s, I got plenty of work illustrating other people's books, mostly in black and white line. It was an excellent apprenticeship. I was married with two small children when I tried my first picture book, Lucy and Tom's Day, an unassuming little book about everyday life. I was very tentative about using colour then. It took a long time to acquire the expansive confidence you need to let go and let it flow across the page. Two big breaks for me were Dogger, which was my first book to be widely published abroad, and being asked by Walker Books to do a series for very young children, which ended up, via The Nursery Collection, as Olly and Me. These books gave me an opportunity to use a very simple, first-person text, in a kind of rhythmical verse form. Recently, I have launched into picture books for older children with more sophisticated themes and artwork. I can't bear hearing grown-ups telling children they can't have picture books any more as they can read! Why remove such a great narrative pleasure?

Things you didn't know about Shirley Hughes

1. At school, I was always the last to be picked for the hockey team.

2. I'm told I was an easy-going baby, but it didn't last.

3. I like birds, but would hate one to come near me.

4. I like ironing.

5. I never travel by underground.

6. I like travelling by bus, especially London buses.

7. Once on Australian TV, I had to hide in a Wendy house then leap out and hug a huge bear.

8. I save elastic bands, paper clips and pieces of string that I find lying about.

9. I jazz about a lot when washing up.

10. I fantasize about having a house by the sea.

More books by this author

Loading similar books...

Other Formats

Book Info

Format

Hardback
32 pages
Interest Age: From 5

Author

Shirley Hughes
More books by Shirley Hughes

Author's Website

www.alfiebooks.co.uk/allabo...

Publisher

Walker Books Ltd

Publication date

1st September 2014

ISBN

9781406348996

Categories


LoveReading4Kids is a modern and creative way of emphasising the value and importance of books in this digital age #booksforlife

Amrit Bunet – Teen

Lovereading is just a convenient way to find new books and hear others opinions on them.

Sarah Murray – age 15

We love Lovereading as my 5 year old loves to read new books before anyone else has a chance, she says it makes reading exciting!

Tracey Chorley

You give me age appropriate ideas of books I can read and buy for the children and find out what other children their age think of them too.

Katie Lonsdale

I think Lovereading4kids is an amazing company because of the friendly staff and the fabulous chance to read great books before publication.

Adam Graham

It’s so easy to find the right book for your child. Such an easy-to-use, yet in-depth website. 100% reliable.

Pippa, Jack, Liam & Matthew Wils

We love Lovereading4kids because they put books in front of us we wouldn’t otherwise have read. They make us more adventurous readers!

Emily Jacques

I love finding new books to read. My mummy and me look at the new ones coming out. I have written reviews of some of them!

Jessica Cobbin – age 7
Lovereading

Lovereading 4 schools