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Audiobooks Narrated by Anna Cohen

Browse audiobooks narrated by Anna Cohen, listen to samples and when you're ready head over to Audiobooks.com where you can get 3 FREE audiobooks on us

LoveReading4Kids Top 10

  1. Aldrin Adams and the Cheese Nightmares Aldrin Adams and the Cheese Nightmares
    1
  2. Big Sky Mountain Big Sky Mountain
    2
  3. The Danger Gang The Danger Gang
    3
  4. How to Be Brave How to Be Brave
    4
  5. Anne of Green Gables Anne of Green Gables
    5
  6. Star Wars The High Republic: A Test of Courage Star Wars The High Republic: A Test of Courage
    6
  7. How I Saved the World in a Week How I Saved the World in a Week
    7
  8. Hide and Secrets: The blockbuster thriller from million-copy bestselling Sophie McKenzie Hide and Secrets: The blockbuster thriller from million-copy bestselling Sophie McKenzie
    8
  9. The Boy in the Black Suit The Boy in the Black Suit
    9
  10. You Are a Champion: How to Be the Best You Can Be You Are a Champion: How to Be the Best You Can Be
    10
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The Raggedy Ann & Andy Collection

The Raggedy Ann & Andy Collection

Author: Johnny Gruelle Narrator: Anna Cohen, David Crandall, Phil Chenevert Release Date: 01/08/2021

The Raggedy Ann & Andy Collection includes the books Raggedy Ann Stories (1918) and Raggedy Andy Stories (1920). Raggedy Ann is a character created by American writer Johnny Gruelle (1880–1938) that appeared in a series of books he wrote and illustrated for young children. Raggedy Ann is a rag doll with red yarn for hair and a triangle nose. The character was created in 1915 as a doll, and was introduced to the public in the 1918 book Raggedy Ann Stories. When a doll was marketed with the book, the concept had great success. A sequel, Raggedy Andy Stories (1920), introduced the character of her brother, Raggedy Andy. Further characters such as Beloved Belindy, a black mammy doll, were featured as dolls and characters in books.

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The Jungle Books

The Jungle Books

Author: Rudyard Kipling Narrator: Anna Cohen, Frank Bryce, Phil Chenevert Release Date: 01/03/2021

The Jungle Book (1894) is a collection of stories by the English author Rudyard Kipling. Most of the characters are animals such as Shere Khan the tiger and Baloo the bear, though a principal character is the boy or 'man-cub' Mowgli, who is raised in the jungle by wolves. The stories are set in a forest in India; one place mentioned repeatedly is 'Seonee' (Seoni), in the central state of Madhya Pradesh. A major theme in the book is abandonment followed by fostering, as in the life of Mowgli, echoing Kipling's own childhood. The theme is echoed in the triumph of protagonists including Rikki-Tikki-Tavi and The White Seal over their enemies, as well as Mowgli's. Another important theme is of law and freedom; the stories are not about animal behaviour, still less about the Darwinian struggle for survival, but about human archetypes in animal form. They teach respect for authority, obedience, and knowing one's place in society with 'the law of the jungle', but the stories also illustrate the freedom to move between different worlds, such as when Mowgli moves between the jungle and the village. Critics have also noted the essential wildness and lawless energies in the stories, reflecting the irresponsible side of human nature. The Second Jungle Book is a sequel to The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling. First published in 1895, it features five stories about Mowgli and three unrelated stories, all but one set in India, most of which Kipling wrote while living in Vermont. All of the stories were previously published in magazines in 1894-5, often under different titles. The 1994 film The Jungle Book used it as a source.

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The Divine Comedy

The Divine Comedy

Author: Dante Alighieri Narrator: Anna Cohen, James Taylor Release Date: 01/08/2020

The Divine Comedy (Italian: Divina Commedia) is a long Italian narrative poem by Dante Alighieri, begun c. 1308 and completed in 1320, a year before his death in 1321. It is widely considered to be the pre-eminent work in Italian literature and one of the greatest works of world literature. The poem's imaginative vision of the afterlife is representative of the medieval world-view as it had developed in the Western Church by the 14th century. It helped establish the Tuscan language, in which it is written, as the standardized Italian language. It is divided into three parts: Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso. The narrative takes as its literal subject the state of souls after death and presents an image of divine justice meted out as due punishment or reward, and describes Dante's travels through Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise or Heaven, while allegorically the poem represents the soul's journey towards God, beginning with the recognition and rejection of sin (Inferno), followed by the penitent Christian life (Purgatorio), which is then followed by the soul's ascent to God (Paradiso). Dante draws on medieval Roman Catholic theology and philosophy, especially Thomistic philosophy derived from the Summa Theologica of Thomas Aquinas. Consequently, the Divine Comedy has been called 'the Summa in verse'. In Dante's work, the pilgrim Dante is accompanied by three guides: Virgil (who represents human reason), Beatrice (who represents divine revelation, theology, faith, and grace), and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (who represents contemplative mysticism and devotion to Mary). Erich Auerbach said Dante was the first writer to depict human beings as the products of a specific time, place and circumstance as opposed to mythic archetypes or a collection of vices and virtues; this along with the fully imagined world of The Divine Comedy, different from our own but fully visualized, suggests that the Divine Comedy could be said to have inaugurated modern fiction.

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Collected Works 1917-1924

Collected Works 1917-1924

Author: Howard Phillips Lovecraft Narrator: Anna Cohen, Zacharias Prewett Release Date: 01/05/2020

Collected Works 1917-1924 include all the short stories and novellas of H.P. Lovecraft published between 1917 and 1924. Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 - March 15, 1937) was an American writer of weird fiction and horror fiction, who is known for his creation of what became the Cthulhu Mythos. Born in Providence, Rhode Island, Lovecraft spent most of his life within New England. He was born into affluence, which ended with the death of his grandfather. In 1913, he wrote a critical letter to a pulp magazine that ultimately led to his involvement in pulp fiction. During the interwar period, he wrote and published stories that focused on his interpretation of humanity's place in the universe. In his view, humanity was an unimportant part of an uncaring cosmos that could be swept away at any moment. These stories also included fantastic elements that represented the perceived fragility of anthropocentrism. Lovecraft was at the center of a wider body of authors known as The Lovecraft Circle. This group wrote stories that frequently shared details between them. He was also a prolific writer of letters. He maintained a correspondence with several different authors and literary proteges. According to some estimates, he wrote approximately 100,000 letters over the course of his lifetime. In these letters, he discussed his worldview and his daily life, and tutored younger authors, such as August Derleth, Donald Wandrei, and Robert Bloch. Throughout his adult life, Lovecraft was never able to support himself from earnings as an author and editor. He was virtually unknown during his lifetime and was almost exclusively published in pulp magazines before he died in poverty at the age of 46, but is now regarded as one of the most significant 20th-century authors of supernatural horror fiction. Among his most celebrated tales are The Call of Cthulhu, The Rats in the Walls, At the Mountains of Madness, The Shadow over Innsmouth, and The Shadow Out of Time. His writings are the basis of the Cthulhu Mythos, which has inspired a large body of pastiches, games, music and other media drawing on Lovecraft's characters, setting and themes, constituting a wider subgenre known as Lovecraftian horror. Included in this collection: 1. A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson (1917) 2. Beyond the Wall of Sleep (1919) 3. Dagon (1919) 4. The White Ship (1919) 5. The Statement of Randolph Carter (1920) 6. The Doom that Came to Sarnath (1920) 7. The Cats of Ulthar (1920) 8. Nyarlathotep (1920) 9. Polaris (1920) 10. The Street (1920) 11. Ex Oblivione (1921) 12. Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family (1921) 13. The Terrible Old Man (1921) 14. The Picture in the House (1921) 15. The Tree (1921) 16. The Nameless City (1921) 17. The Tomb (1922) 18. The Music of Erich Zann (1922) 19. Celephaïs (1922) 20. Herbert West - Reanimator (1922) 21. The Lurking Fear (1923) 22. Memory (1923) 23. Hypnos (1923) 24. What the Moon Brings (1923) 25. The Hound (1924) 26. The Rats in the Walls (1924)

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Shirley

Shirley

Author: Charlotte Brontë Narrator: Anna Cohen, Cynthia Franklin, Helen Pyle Release Date: 01/05/2020

Shirley, A Tale is a social novel by the English novelist Charlotte Brontë, first published in 1849. It was Brontë's second published novel after Jane Eyre (originally published under Brontë's pseudonym Currer Bell). The novel is set in Yorkshire in 1811-12, during the industrial depression resulting from the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812. The novel is set against the backdrop of the Luddite uprisings in the Yorkshire textile industry. The novel's popularity led to Shirley's becoming a woman's name. The title character was given the name that her father had intended to give a son. Before the publication of the novel Shirley was an uncommon but distinctly male name. Today it is regarded as a distinctly female name.

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The Complete Tales & Novels of Edgar Allan Poe

The Complete Tales & Novels of Edgar Allan Poe

Author: Edgar Allan Poe Narrator: Anna Cohen, Zacharias Prewett Release Date: 01/04/2020

The Complete Tales & Novels of Edgar Allan Poe includes the 66 tales and 2 full-length novels of Edgar Allan Poe. Edgar Allan Poe (born Edgar Poe; January 19, 1809 - October 7, 1849) was an American writer, poet, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories, particularly his tales of mystery and the macabre. He is widely regarded as a central figure of Romanticism in the United States and of American literature as a whole, and he was one of the country's earliest practitioners of the short story. He is also generally considered the inventor of the detective fiction genre and is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction. Poe was the first well-known American writer to earn a living through writing alone, resulting in a financially difficult life and career. Included in this collection: 1. Metzengerstein (1832) 2. The Duc de L'Omelette (1832) 3. A Tale of Jerusalem (1832) 4. Loss of Breath (1832) 5. Bon-Bon (1832) 6. MS. Found in a Bottle (1833) 7. The Assignation (1834) 8. Berenice (1835) 9. Morella (1835) 10. Lionizing (1835) 11. The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaall (1835) 12. King Pest (1835) 13. Shadow (1835) 14. Four Beasts in One (1836) 15. Mystification (1837) 16. Silence (1838) 17. Ligeia (1838) 18. How to Write a Blackwood Article (1838) 19. A Predicament (1838) 20. The Devil in the Belfry (1839) 21. The Man That Was Used Up (1839) 22. The Fall of the House of Usher (1839) 23. William Wilson (1839) 24. The Conversation of Eiros and Charmion (1839) 25. Why the Little Frenchman Wears His Hand in a Sling (1840) 26. The Business Man (1840) 27. The Man of the Crowd (1840) 28. The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841) 29. A Descent into the Maelström (1841) 30. The Island of the Fay (1841) 31. The Colloquy of Monos and Una (1841) 32. Never Bet the Devil Your Head (1841) 33. Eleonora (1841) 34. Three Sundays in a Week (1841) 35. The Oval Portrait (1842) 36. The Masque of the Red Death (1842) 37. The Landscape Garden (1842) 38. The Mystery of Marie Rogêt (1842/43) 39. The Pit and the Pendulum (1842/43) 40. The Tell-Tale Heart (1843) 41. The Gold-Bug (1843) 42. The Black Cat (1843) 43. Diddling (1843) 44. The Spectacles (1844) 45. A Tale of the Ragged Mountains (1844) 46. The Premature Burial (1844) 47. Mesmeric Revelation (1844) 48. The Oblong Box (1844) 49. The Angel of the Odd (1844) 50. Thou Art the Man (1844) 51. The Literary Life of Thingum Bob, Esq. (1844) 52. The Purloined Letter (1844/45) 53. The Thousand-and-Second Tale of Scheherazade (1845) 54. Some Words with a Mummy (1845) 55. The Power of Words (1845) 56. The Imp of the Perverse (1845) 57. The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether (1845) 58. The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar (1845) 59. The Sphinx (1846) 60. The Cask of Amontillado (1846) 61. The Domain of Arnheim (1847) 62. Mellonta Tauta (1849) 63. Hop-Frog (1849) 64. Von Kempelen and His Discovery (1849) 65. X-ing a Paragrab (1849) 66. Landor's Cottage (1849) 67. The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1837) 68. The Journal of Julius Rodman (1840)

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The Complete Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen

The Complete Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen

Author: Hans Christian Andersen Narrator: Anna Cohen, Michael Powers Release Date: 01/02/2020

The Complete Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen is a collection of the 139 fairy tales by Hans Christian Andersen, published between 1835 and 1872. Hans Christian Andersen (2 April 1805 - 4 August 1875), in Denmark usually called H.C. Andersen, was a Danish author. Although a prolific writer of plays, travelogues, novels, and poems, he is best remembered for his fairy tales. Andersen's popularity is not limited to children; his stories express themes that transcend age and nationality. Andersen's fairy tales, consisting of 139 works and translated into more than 125 languages, have become culturally embedded in the West's collective consciousness, readily accessible to children, but presenting lessons of virtue and resilience in the face of adversity for mature readers as well. His most famous fairy tales include The Emperor's New Clothes, The Little Mermaid, The Nightingale, The Steadfast Tin Soldier, The Red Shoes, The Princess and the Pea, The Snow Queen, The Ugly Duckling, The Little Match Girl and Thumbelina. His stories have inspired ballets, plays, and animated and live-action films. One of Copenhagen's widest and busiest boulevards, skirting Copenhagen City Hall Square at the corner of which Andersen's larger-than-life bronze statue sits, is named H.C. Andersens Boulevard.

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The Iliad & The Odyssey

The Iliad & The Odyssey

Author: Homer Narrator: Anna Cohen, Michael Powers Release Date: 01/12/2019

The Iliad (Ancient Greek: Ἰλιάς Iliás; sometimes referred to as the Song of Ilion or Song of Ilium) is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer. Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles. Although the story covers only a few weeks in the final year of the war, the Iliad mentions or alludes to many of the Greek legends about the siege; the earlier events, such as the gathering of warriors for the siege, the cause of the war, and related concerns tend to appear near the beginning. Then the epic narrative takes up events prophesied for the future, such as Achilles' imminent death and the fall of Troy, although the narrative ends before these events take place. However, as these events are prefigured and alluded to more and more vividly, when it reaches an end the poem has told a more or less complete tale of the Trojan War. The Odyssey (Greek: Ὀδύσσεια Odýsseia) is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other Homeric epic. The Odyssey is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the second-oldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad is the oldest. Scholars believe the Odyssey was composed near the end of the 8th century BC, somewhere in Ionia, the Greek coastal region of Anatolia. The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus (known as Ulysses in Roman myths), king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy. It takes Odysseus ten years to reach Ithaca after the ten-year Trojan War. In his absence, it is assumed Odysseus has died, and his wife Penelope and son Telemachus must deal with a group of unruly suitors, the Mnesteres (Greek: Μνηστῆρες) or Proci, who compete for Penelope's hand in marriage.

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