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Audiobooks Narrated by David Sadzin

Browse audiobooks narrated by David Sadzin, listen to samples and when you're ready head over to Audiobooks.com where you can get 3 FREE audiobooks on us

LoveReading4Kids Top 10

  1. Alfie Gets in First and Other Stories Alfie Gets in First and Other Stories
    1
  2. The Tindims of Rubbish Island The Tindims of Rubbish Island
    2
  3. The Creakers The Creakers
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  4. Cookie! (Book 2): Cookie and the Most Annoying Girl in the World Cookie! (Book 2): Cookie and the Most Annoying Girl in the World
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  5. The Shark Caller The Shark Caller
    5
  6. A Spoonful of Murder: A Murder Most Unladylike Mystery A Spoonful of Murder: A Murder Most Unladylike Mystery
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  7. Robinson Crusoe - Daniel Defoe Robinson Crusoe - Daniel Defoe
    7
  8. Kay’s Anatomy: A Complete (and Completely Disgusting) Guide to the Human Body Kay’s Anatomy: A Complete (and Completely Disgusting) Guide to the Human Body
    8
  9. All American Boys All American Boys
    9
  10. The Lost Spells The Lost Spells
    10
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No Common Ground: Confederate Monuments and the Ongoing Fight for Racial Justice

No Common Ground: Confederate Monuments and the Ongoing Fight for Racial Justice

Author: Karen L. Cox Narrator: David Sadzin Release Date: 01/03/2021

When it comes to Confederate monuments, there is no common ground. Polarizing debates over their meaning have intensified into legislative maneuvering to preserve the statues, legal battles to remove them, and rowdy crowds taking matters into their own hands. These conflicts have raged for well over a century-but they've never been as intense as they are today. In this eye-opening narrative of the efforts to raise, preserve, protest, and remove Confederate monuments, Karen L. Cox depicts what these statues meant to those who erected them and how a movement arose to force a reckoning. She lucidly shows the forces that drove white southerners to construct beacons of white supremacy, as well as the ways that antimonument sentiment, largely stifled during the Jim Crow era, returned with the civil rights movement and gathered momentum in the decades after the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Monument defenders responded with gerrymandering and 'heritage' laws intended to block efforts to remove these statues, but hard as they worked to preserve the Lost Cause vision of southern history, civil rights activists, Black elected officials, and movements of ordinary people fought harder to take the story back.

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The Black Church in the African American Experience

The Black Church in the African American Experience

Author: C. Eric Lincoln, Lawrence H. Mamiya Narrator: David Sadzin Release Date: 01/03/2021

Black churches in America have long been recognized as the most independent, stable, and dominant institutions in black communities. The Black Church in the African American Experience, based on a ten-year study, is the largest nongovernmental study of urban and rural churches ever undertaken and the first major field study on the subject since the 1930s. Drawing on interviews with more than 1,800 black clergy in both urban and rural settings, combined with a comprehensive historical overview of seven mainline black denominations, C. Eric Lincoln and Lawrence H. Mamiya present an analysis of the Black Church as it relates to the history of African Americans and to contemporary black culture. In examining both the internal structure of the Church and the reactions of the Church to external, societal changes, the authors provide important insights into the Church's relationship to politics, economics, women, youth, and music. Among other topics, Lincoln and Mamiya discuss the attitude of the clergy toward women pastors, the reaction of the Church to the civil rights movement, the attempts of the Church to involve young people, the impact of the black consciousness movement and Black Liberation Theology and clergy, and trends that will define the Black Church well into the next century.

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Race, Work, and Leadership: New Perspectives on the Black Experience

Race, Work, and Leadership: New Perspectives on the Black Experience

Race, Work, and Leadership is a rare and important compilation of essays that examines how race matters in people's experience of work and leadership. What does it mean to be black in corporate America today? How are racial dynamics in organizations changing? How do we build inclusive organizations? Inspired by and developed in conjunction with the research and programming for Harvard Business School's commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the HBS African American Student Union, this groundbreaking book shines new light on these and other timely questions and illuminates the present-day dynamics of race in the workplace. Contributions from top scholars, researchers, and practitioners in leadership, organizational behavior, psychology, sociology, and education test the relevance of long-held assumptions and reconsider the research approaches and interventions needed to understand and advance African Americans in work settings and leadership roles. Race, Work, and Leadership will stimulate new scholarship and dialogue on the organizational and leadership challenges of African Americans and become the indispensable reference for anyone committed to understanding, studying, and acting on the challenges facing leaders who are building inclusive organizations.

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No Planet B: A Teen Vogue Guide to Climate Justice

No Planet B: A Teen Vogue Guide to Climate Justice

Teen Vogue, the fresh voice of a generation of activists, curates a dynamic collection of timely pieces on the climate justice movement. With accessible, concise explanations of the features and causes of climate change as well as pieces urging an intersectional approach to environmental justice, this book is the handbook for the emerging youth climate movement. Using a feminist, indigenous, antiracist, internationalist lens, the book paints a picture of a world in climate crisis and presents bold, courageous ideas for how to save it. Featuring introductions from leading climate activists, No Planet B is essential listening for everyone fighting for a Green New Deal and more.

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We Will Shoot Back: Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement

We Will Shoot Back: Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement

Author: Akinyele Omowale Umoja Narrator: David Sadzin Release Date: 01/01/2021

A bold and exciting historical narrative of the armed resistance of Black soldiers of the Mississippi Freedom Movement In We Will Shoot Back: Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement, Akinyele Omowale Umoja argues that armed resistance was critical to the Southern freedom struggle and the dismantling of segregation and Black disenfranchisement. Intimidation and fear were central to the system of oppression in most of the Deep South. To overcome the system of segregation, Black people had to overcome fear to present a significant challenge to White domination. As the civil rights movement developed, armed self-defense and resistance became a significant means by which the descendants of enslaved Africans overturned fear and intimidation and developed different political and social relationships between Black and White Mississippians. This riveting historical narrative reconstructs the armed resistance of Black activists, their challenge of racist terrorism, and their fight for human rights.

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The Tuskegee Syphilis Study: An Insiders' Account of the Shocking Medical Experiment Conducted by Go

The Tuskegee Syphilis Study: An Insiders' Account of the Shocking Medical Experiment Conducted by Go

Author: Fred D. Gray Narrator: David Sadzin Release Date: 01/01/2021

In 1932, the US Public Health Service recruited 623 African American men from Macon County, Alabama, for a study of 'the effects of untreated syphilis in the Negro male.' For the next forty years-even after the development of penicillin, the cure for syphilis-these men were denied medical care for this potentially fatal disease. The Tuskegee Syphilis Study was exposed in 1972, and in 1975 the government settled a lawsuit but stopped short of admitting wrongdoing. In 1997, President Bill Clinton welcomed five of the study survivors to the White House and, on behalf of the nation, officially apologized for an experiment he described as wrongful and racist. In this book, the attorney for the men describes the background of the study, the investigation and the lawsuit, the events leading up to the presidential apology, and the ongoing efforts to see that out of this painful and tragic episode of American history comes lasting good.

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My Own Story

My Own Story

Author: Jackie Robinson Narrator: David Sadzin Release Date: 01/12/2020

The extraordinary memoir from baseball icon Jackie Robinson-originally published in 1948, just a year after he shattered baseball's color barrier, and now released as an audiobook for the very first time. "I'm not concerned with your liking or disliking me...all I ask is that you respect me as a human being." So says #42, who comes alive to share his story, up to and through that historic first season, as told to famed sportswriter Wendell Smith, with a foreword by Brooklyn Dodgers General Manager Branch Rickey. Travel back in time, as the Dodgers legend guides you through his athletic upbringing, his short stint with the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues, and his breakthrough to the big leagues, at the age of twenty-eight.

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African Dominion: A New History of Empire in Early and Medieval West Africa

African Dominion: A New History of Empire in Early and Medieval West Africa

Author: Michael Gomez Narrator: David Sadzin Release Date: 01/12/2020

A groundbreaking book that puts early and medieval West Africa on the map of global history Pick up almost any book on early and medieval world history and empire, and where do you find West Africa? On the periphery. This pioneering book tells a different story. Interweaving political and social history and drawing on a rich array of sources, Michael Gomez unveils a new vision of how categories of ethnicity, race, gender, and caste emerged in Africa and in global history. Focusing on the Savannah and Sahel region, Gomez traces how Islam's growth in West Africa, along with intensifying commerce that included slaves, resulted in a series of political experiments unique to the region, culminating in the rise of empire. A radically new account of the importance of early Africa in global history, African Dominion will be the standard work on the subject for years to come.

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1919, The Year of Racial Violence: How African Americans Fought Back

1919, The Year of Racial Violence: How African Americans Fought Back

Author: David F. Krugler Narrator: David Sadzin Release Date: 01/12/2020

1919, The Year of Racial Violence recounts African Americans' brave stand against a cascade of mob attacks in the United States after World War I. The emerging New Negro identity, which prized unflinching resistance to second-class citizenship, further inspired veterans and their fellow black citizens. In city after city-Washington, DC; Chicago; Charleston; and elsewhere-black men and women took up arms to repel mobs that used lynching, assaults, and other forms of violence to protect white supremacy; yet, authorities blamed blacks for the violence, leading to mass arrests and misleading news coverage. Refusing to yield, African Americans sought accuracy and fairness in the courts of public opinion and the law. This is the first account of this three-front fight-in the streets, in the press, and in the courts-against mob violence during one of the worst years of racial conflict in US history.

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What Is the Civil Rights Movement?

What Is the Civil Rights Movement?

Author: Sherri L. Smith Narrator: David Sadzin Release Date: 01/12/2020

Relive the moments when African Americans fought for equal rights, and made history. Even though slavery had ended in the 1860s, African Americans were still suffering under the weight of segregation a hundred years later. They couldn't go to the same schools, eat at the same restaurants, or even use the same bathrooms as white people. But by the 1950s, black people refused to remain second-class citizens and were willing to risk their lives to make a change. Author Sherri L. Smith brings to life momentous events through the words and stories of people who were on the frontlines of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

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Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression

Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression

Author: Robin Dg Kelley Narrator: David Sadzin Release Date: 01/11/2020

A groundbreaking contribution to the history of the 'long Civil Rights movement,' Hammer and Hoe tells the story of how, during the 1930s and '40s, Communists took on Alabama's repressive, racist police state to fight for economic justice, civil and political rights, and racial equality. The Alabama Communist Party was made up of working people without a Euro-American radical political tradition: devoutly religious and semiliterate black laborers and sharecroppers, and a handful of whites, including unemployed industrial workers, housewives, youth, and renegade liberals. In this book, Robin D. G. Kelley reveals how the experiences and identities of these people from Alabama's farms, factories, mines, kitchens, and city streets shaped the Party's tactics and unique political culture. The result was a remarkably resilient movement forged in a racist world that had little tolerance for radicals. After discussing the book's origins and impact in a new preface written for this twenty-fifth-anniversary edition, Kelley reflects on what a militantly antiracist, radical movement in the heart of Dixie might teach contemporary social movements confronting rampant inequality, police violence, mass incarceration, and neoliberalism.

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Seven Sisters and a Brother: Friendship, Resistance, and Untold Truths Behind Black Student Activism

Seven Sisters and a Brother: Friendship, Resistance, and Untold Truths Behind Black Student Activism

Meet the inspirational students: This narrative tells the story of seven women and one man at the heart of a sit-in protesting decreased enrollment and hiring of African Americans at Swarthmore College and demanding a Black Studies curriculum. The book, written by the former students themselves, also includes autobiographical chapters, providing a unique cross-sectional view into the lives of young people during the Civil Rights era. Correcting media representation: For years the media and some in the school community portrayed the peaceful protest in a negative light-this collective narrative provides a very necessary and overdue retelling of the revolution that took place at Swarthmore College in 1969. The group of eight student protestors have only recently begun to receive credit for the school's greater inclusiveness, as well as the influence their actions had on universities around the country. Stories that inspire change: This book chronicles the historical eight-day sit-in at Swarthmore College, and the authors also include untold stories about their family backgrounds and their experiences as student activists. They share how friendships, out-of-the-box alliances, and a commitment to moral integrity strengthened them to push through and remain resilient in the face of adversity.

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