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Audiobooks Narrated by Eve Karpf

Browse audiobooks narrated by Eve Karpf, listen to samples and when you're ready head over to Audiobooks.com where you can get 3 FREE audiobooks on us

LoveReading4Kids Top 10

  1. The Beatrix Potter Collection The Beatrix Potter Collection
    1
  2. A Bear Called Paddington A Bear Called Paddington
    2
  3. Cookie! (Book 3): Cookie and the Most Mysterious Mystery in the World Cookie! (Book 3): Cookie and the Most Mysterious Mystery in the World
    3
  4. Grimwood: Laugh your head off with the funniest new series of the year, from award-winning Nadia Shi Grimwood: Laugh your head off with the funniest new series of the year, from award-winning Nadia Shi
    4
  5. A Series of Unfortunate Events #1: The Bad Beginning A Series of Unfortunate Events #1: The Bad Beginning
    5
  6. Fireborn: Twelve and the Frozen Forest Fireborn: Twelve and the Frozen Forest
    6
  7. New Kid New Kid
    7
  8. Cane Warriors Cane Warriors
    8
  9. When The World Was Ours When The World Was Ours
    9
  10. Black Boy Joy: 17 Stories Celebrating Black Boyhood Black Boy Joy: 17 Stories Celebrating Black Boyhood
    10
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The Poetry of Anne Kingsmill Finch

The Poetry of Anne Kingsmill Finch

Author: Anne Kingsmill Finch Narrator: Eve Karpf, Ghizela Rowe, Libby Brunton Release Date: 01/10/2020

Anne Kingsmill was born in April 1661 (an exact date is not known) in Sydmonton, Hampshire.Throughout her life Anne was involved in several Court cases that dragged on for years. These involved both a share of her parent's estate for her education and later her and her husband's share of an inheritance. In 1682, Anne became a maid of honour to Mary of Modena (wife of James, Duke of York, and later King James II) at St James's Palace. Anne's interest in poetry began at the palace, and she started writing her own verse. The Court however was no place for a woman to display any poetic efforts. Women were not considered suitable for such literary pursuits. At court, Anne met Colonel Heneage Finch. A courtier as well as a soldier. The couple married on 15th May 1684. The couple's marriage was enduring and happy, in part due to the equality in their partnership. Her poetic skills blossomed as she expressed her love for her husband and the positive effects of his encouragement on her artistic development. Being staunch Catholics in a changing and volatile Protestant world would bring them many problems to endure. Her husband continued to support her poetry and in 1701 she published 'The Spleen' anonymously. This well-received reflection on depression would prove to be her most popular poem. However, it also revealed the continuing and mounting problem of her own frequent depressions. When 'Miscellany Poems, on Several Occasions' was published in 1713, the cover of the first edition stated that the works were "Written by a Lady." On subsequent printings, she received credit as Anne, Countess of Winchelsea. Anne Kingsmill-Finch, Countess of Winchilsea died in Westminster on 5th August 1720.

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The Poetry of Mirabai

The Poetry of Mirabai

Author: Mirabai Narrator: Eve Karpf, Ghizela Rowe, Libby Brunton Release Date: 01/10/2020

Mirabai was a Rajput princess born to the Rathore clan in 1498 in Kudaki, Rajasthan in northern India. Despite being one of the most significant saints in the Bhakti tradition and an immensely popular Hindu mystic and religious poet, very few facts are actually known about her life including her date of birth. It is clear that her mother died when she was very young and she was greatly influenced by her father, also a worshipper of Krishna. From a young age Mirabai's devotion to Krishna was absolute surrender and complete devotion. It was only with great reluctance that she entered a marriage, arranged by her uncle, to Prince Bhoj Raj of Chittor in 1516. The marriage ended after 5 years with the death, in quick succession, of her husband and then father-in-law, who was her protector. Her now public display of faith, mainly demonstrated by attending religious meetings, or Satsangs, with their devotional singing and dancing, brought persecution by her remaining in-laws who insisted she stop. On hearing that her brother-in-law, Vikramaditya, the then king of Chittor, might harm or even kill her, she fled.She travelled through northern India expressing her love for Krishna with some 1300 bhajans or sacred songs, usually composed with a simple rhythm and a repeated refrain. Her use of everyday language, infused with a sweetness of emotion and charm brought her a growing respect and popularity It is popularly believed that she spent her last years as a pilgrim in Dwarka Gujarat and miraculously merged with the image of Krishna in 1556.

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The British Short Story - Volume 1 - Aphra Behn to Mary Shelley

The British Short Story - Volume 1 - Aphra Behn to Mary Shelley

Author: Aphra Behn, Jonathan Swift, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Narrator: Eve Karpf, Ghizela Rowe Release Date: 01/10/2020

These British Isles, moored across from mainland Europe, are more often seen as a world unto themselves. Restless and creative, they often warred amongst themselves until they began a global push to forge a World Empire of territory, of trade and of language.Here our ambitions are only of the literary kind. These shores have mustered many masters of literature. So this anthology's boundaries includes only those authors who were born in the British Isles - which as a geographical definition is the UK mainland and the island of Ireland - and wrote in a familiar form of English.Whilst Daniel Defoe is the normal starting point we begin a little earlier with Aphra Behn, an equally colourful character as well as an astonishing playwright and poet. And this is how we begin to differentiate our offering; both in scope, in breadth and in depth. These islands have raised and nurtured female authors of the highest order and rank and more often than not they have been sidelined or ignored in favour of that other gender which usually gets the plaudits and the royalties.Way back when it was almost immoral that a woman should write. A few pages of verse might be tolerated but anything else brought ridicule and shame. That seems unfathomable now but centuries ago women really were chattel, with marriage being, as the Victorian author Charlotte Smith boldly stated 'legal prostitution'. Some of course did find a way through - Jane Austen, the Brontes and Virginia Woolf but for many others only by changing their names to that of men was it possible to get their book to publication and into a readers hands. Here we include George Eliot and other examples.We add further depth with many stories by authors who were famed and fawned over in their day. Some wrote only a hidden gem or two before succumbing to poverty and death. There was no second career as a game show guest, reality TV contestant or youtuber. They remain almost forgotten outposts of talent who never prospered despite devoted hours of pen and brain.Keeping to a chronological order helps us to highlight how authors through the ages played around with characters and narrative to achieve distinctive results across many scenarios, many styles and many genres. The short story became a sort of literary laboratory, an early disruptor, of how to present and how to appeal to a growing audience as a reflection of social and societal changes. Was this bound to happen or did a growing population that could read begin to influence rather than just accept?Moving through the centuries we gather a groundswell of authors as we hit the Victorian Age - an age of physical mass communication albeit only on an actual printed page. An audience was offered a multitude of forms: novels (both whole and in serialised form) essays, short stories, poems all in weekly, monthly and quarterly form. Many of these periodicals were founded or edited by literary behemoths from Dickens and Thackeray through to Jerome K Jerome and, even some female editors including Ethel Colburn Mayne, Alice Meynell and Ella D'Arcy.Now authors began to offer a wider, more diverse choice from social activism and justice - and injustice to cutting stories of manners and principles. From many forms of comedy to mental meltdowns, from science fiction to unrequited heartache. If you can imagine it an author probably wrote it. At the end of the 19th Century bestseller lists and then prizes, such as the Nobel and Pulitzer, helped focus an audience's attention to a books literary merit and sales worth. Previously coffeehouses, Imperial trade, unscrupulous overseas printers ignoring copyright restrictions, publishers with their book lists as an appendix and the gossip and interchange of polite society had been the main avenues to secure sales and profits.

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The British Short Story - Volume 3 - Anthony Trollope to Hesba Stratton

The British Short Story - Volume 3 - Anthony Trollope to Hesba Stratton

Author: Anthony Trollope, George Eliot, Hesba Stratton Narrator: Eve Karpf, Ghizela Rowe Release Date: 01/10/2020

These British Isles, moored across from mainland Europe, are more often seen as a world unto themselves. Restless and creative, they often warred amongst themselves until they began a global push to forge a World Empire of territory, of trade and of language.Here our ambitions are only of the literary kind. These shores have mustered many masters of literature. So this anthology's boundaries includes only those authors who were born in the British Isles - which as a geographical definition is the UK mainland and the island of Ireland - and wrote in a familiar form of English.Whilst Daniel Defoe is the normal starting point we begin a little earlier with Aphra Behn, an equally colourful character as well as an astonishing playwright and poet. And this is how we begin to differentiate our offering; both in scope, in breadth and in depth. These islands have raised and nurtured female authors of the highest order and rank and more often than not they have been sidelined or ignored in favour of that other gender which usually gets the plaudits and the royalties.Way back when it was almost immoral that a woman should write. A few pages of verse might be tolerated but anything else brought ridicule and shame. That seems unfathomable now but centuries ago women really were chattel, with marriage being, as the Victorian author Charlotte Smith boldly stated 'legal prostitution'. Some of course did find a way through - Jane Austen, the Brontes and Virginia Woolf but for many others only by changing their names to that of men was it possible to get their book to publication and into a readers hands. Here we include George Eliot and other examples.We add further depth with many stories by authors who were famed and fawned over in their day. Some wrote only a hidden gem or two before succumbing to poverty and death. There was no second career as a game show guest, reality TV contestant or youtuber. They remain almost forgotten outposts of talent who never prospered despite devoted hours of pen and brain.Keeping to a chronological order helps us to highlight how authors through the ages played around with characters and narrative to achieve distinctive results across many scenarios, many styles and many genres. The short story became a sort of literary laboratory, an early disruptor, of how to present and how to appeal to a growing audience as a reflection of social and societal changes. Was this bound to happen or did a growing population that could read begin to influence rather than just accept?Moving through the centuries we gather a groundswell of authors as we hit the Victorian Age - an age of physical mass communication albeit only on an actual printed page. An audience was offered a multitude of forms: novels (both whole and in serialised form) essays, short stories, poems all in weekly, monthly and quarterly form. Many of these periodicals were founded or edited by literary behemoths from Dickens and Thackeray through to Jerome K Jerome and, even some female editors including Ethel Colburn Mayne, Alice Meynell and Ella D'Arcy.Now authors began to offer a wider, more diverse choice from social activism and justice - and injustice to cutting stories of manners and principles. From many forms of comedy to mental meltdowns, from science fiction to unrequited heartache. If you can imagine it an author probably wrote it. At the end of the 19th Century bestseller lists and then prizes, such as the Nobel and Pulitzer, helped focus an audience's attention to a books literary merit and sales worth. Previously coffeehouses, Imperial trade, unscrupulous overseas printers ignoring copyright restrictions, publishers with their book lists as an appendix and the gossip and interchange of polite society had been the main avenues to secure sales and profits.

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An Hour of Nature Poems - Volume 2

An Hour of Nature Poems - Volume 2

Silence is rare in Nature.When we really listen, Nature is conducting symphonies of sound as her world goes about the day and night. Her invisible heartbeat is everywhere, for everyone.Our eyes are constantly bathed in the wonder of her ways, the soft drizzle of rain from soft grey clouds, the bleached harsh desert sand of a noon day, a wave caressing the shore, to the ravenous colours of a departing sunset. Indeed, whenever we look and listen to the vastness of our world Nature's beauty is always there for us. She placates our anger, soothes our pain. Her vistas feed our hearts and souls; the world of a single flower brings a smile.In these 60 minutes nature takes us through her world of wonder.

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The Poetry of Amy Levy

The Poetry of Amy Levy

Author: Amy Levy Narrator: Eve Karpf, Ghizela Rowe, Richard Mitchley Release Date: 01/05/2020

Amy Levy was born in London, England in 1861, the second of seven in a fairly wealthy Anglo-Jewish family. The children read and participated in secular literary activities and became firmly integrated into Victorian life.Her education was at Brighton High School, Brighton, before studies at Newnham College, Cambridge; she was the first Jewish student when she arrived in 1879, but left after four terms.Amy’s writing career began early; her poem ‘Ida Grey’ appeared when she was only fourteen. Her acclaimed short stories ‘Cohen of Trinity’ and ‘Wise in Their Generation,’ were published by Oscar Wilde in his magazine ‘Women's World’.Her poetic writings reveal feminist concerns; ‘Xantippe and Other Verses’, from 1881 includes a poem in the voice of Socrates's wife. ‘A Minor Poet and Other Verse’ from 1884 comprises of dramatic monologues and lyric poems.In 1886, Amy began a series of essays on Jewish culture and literature for the Jewish Chronicle, including ‘The Ghetto at Florence’, ‘The Jew in Fiction’, ‘Jewish Humour’ and ‘Jewish Children’.That same year while travelling in Florence she met the writer Vernon Lee. It is generally assumed they fell in love and this inspired the poem ‘To Vernon Lee’.Her first novel ‘Romance of a Shop’, written in 1888 is based on four sisters who experience the pleasures and hardships of running a London business during the 1880s. This was followed by Reuben Sachs (also 1888) and concerned with Jewish identity and mores in the England of her time and was somewhat controversial.Her final book of poems, ‘A London Plane-Tree’ from 1889, shows the beginnings of the influence of French symbolism.Despite many friendships and an active life, Amy suffered for many years with serious depressions and this, together with her growing deafness, led her to commit suicide by inhaling carbon monoxide on September 10th, 1889. She was 27.

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The Poets of the 19th Century - Volume 1

The Poets of the 19th Century - Volume 1

Author: Charlotte Bronte, Lord Byron, Robert Browning Narrator: Eve Karpf, Ghizela Rowe, Richard Mitchley Release Date: 01/05/2020

This is a Century for the history books. The Chinese curse of living in interesting times could not be more suited.A small island continued its expansion across the globe bringing both good and evil in its march. Empires clashed. Revolution shook many. The Industrial Age was upon us.Poets spoke up against slavery bringing social and political pressure upon an abominable horror. It was also the Age of the Romantics; Shelley, Keats, Byron lyrically rapture. Tennyson, Arnold, Browning rode a century of sweeping change of dynamism and great verse.

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The Crystal Egg

The Crystal Egg

Author: H.G. Wells Narrator: Eve Karpf Release Date: 01/01/2020

Herbert George Wells was born on September 21st, 1866 in Bromley in Kent. He was the youngest of four siblings and his family affectionately knew him as ‘Bertie’. The first few years of his childhood were spent fairly quietly, and Wells didn’t display much literary interest until, in 1874, he accidentally broke his leg and was left to recover in bed, largely entertained by the library of books his father regularly brought him. Through these Wells found he could escape the boredom and misery of his bed and convalescence by exploring the new worlds he encountered in these books.From these humble beginnings began a career that was, after several delays, to be seen as one of the most brilliant of modern English writers. Able to write comfortably in a number of genres he was especially applauded for his science fiction works such as The Time Machine and War of the Worlds but his forays into the social conditions of the times, with classics such as Kipps, were almost as commercially successful. His short stories are miniature masterpieces many of which bring new and incredible ideas of science fiction to the edge of present day science fact. Wells also received four nominations for the Nobel Prize in LiteratureDespite a strong and lasting second marriage his affairs with other women also brought the complications of fathering other children. His writings and work against fascism, as well as the promotion of socialism, brought him into increasing doubts with, and opposition to, religion. His writings on what the world could be in works, such as A Modern Utopia, are thought-provoking as well as being plausible, especially when viewed from the distressing times they were written in.His diabetic condition pushed him to create what is now the largest Diabetes charity in the United Kingdom. Wells even found the time to run twice for Parliament. It was a long, distinguished and powerfully successful career by the time he died, aged 79, on August 13th, 1946.

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Words On Water - A Short Story Collection

Words On Water - A Short Story Collection

Water. H2O. Adams Ale. An essential for life. Without it life is impossible. Was it always that way? In this volume of stories water becomes the landscape and narrative, a character more deadly and perhaps more aware of its power than us mere mortals. We are beguiled by its sight. Whether softly breaking waves on a sandy beach or a thunderous storm engulfing the cliff face. But also in other forms; as lakes and lagoons. Water is everywhere and where there is water is the shadow of menace.

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Classic Short Stories - Volume 5

Classic Short Stories - Volume 5

Author: Edward Lear, Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain Narrator: Eve Karpf, James Taylor, Stuart Milligan Release Date: 01/01/2020

Stories are one of mankind’s greatest artistic achievements. Whether written down or spoken they have an ability to capture our imagination and thoughts, and take us on incredible journeys in the space of a phrase and the turn of a page.Within a few words of text or speech, new worlds and characters form, propelling a narrative to a conclusion with intricate ease. Finely crafted, perfectly formed these Miniature Masterpieces, at first thought, seem remarkably easy to conjure up. But ask any writer and they will tell you that distilling the essence of narrative and characters into a short story is one of the hardest acts of their literary craft. Many attempt, but few achieve.

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Classic Short Stories - Volume 8

Classic Short Stories - Volume 8

Author: H.G. Wells, Katherine Mansfield Narrator: Eve Karpf, Richard Mitchley Release Date: 01/01/2020

Stories are one of mankind’s greatest artistic achievements. Whether written down or spoken they have an ability to capture our imagination and thoughts, and take us on incredible journeys in the space of a phrase and the turn of a page.Within a few words of text or speech, new worlds and characters form, propelling a narrative to a conclusion with intricate ease. Finely crafted, perfectly formed these Miniature Masterpieces, at first thought, seem remarkably easy to conjure up. But ask any writer and they will tell you that distilling the essence of narrative and characters into a short story is one of the hardest acts of their literary craft. Many attempt, but few achieve.

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Classic Short Stories - Volume 24

Classic Short Stories - Volume 24

Stories are one of mankind’s greatest artistic achievements. Whether written down or spoken they have an ability to capture our imagination and thoughts, and take us on incredible journeys in the space of a phrase and the turn of a page.Within a few words of text or speech, new worlds and characters form, propelling a narrative to a conclusion with intricate ease. Finely crafted, perfectly formed these Miniature Masterpieces, at first thought, seem remarkably easy to conjure up. But ask any writer and they will tell you that distilling the essence of narrative and characters into a short story is one of the hardest acts of their literary craft. Many attempt, but few achieve.

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